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Table of Contents

  1. Report: A Comparative Analysis of the C++, Java and Python Languages
  2. SDLC: Strategic Education Management System (SEMS)
  3. Coding: Java Tower Defense Game
  4. Report: OS Fingerprinting Techniques & Tools
  5. Management: Marketing SocialWizer: An International Mobile App
  6. Report: Android Marketing Strategy
  7. Report: The Progression of Middleham Castle
  8. Report: Rievaulx Abbey and the History of its Inhabitants
  9. Report: An Analysis of Building the Roman Empire

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Report: A Comparative Analysis of the C++, Java and Python Languages
Course: Principles of Programming Languages
Spring 2014
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Wrote a 14,816 word, 66 page and 36 source comparative analysis of the C++, Java and Python languages based on fundamental features and advanced features. The fundamental features included the programming domain, programming paradigm, readability, simplicity, orthogonality, portability, programming environment and usage cost. The advanced features examined the translation process, data types variables and support for abstraction, expressions and assignment statements, control structures, subprograms, support for inheritance, support for polymorphism, support for file processing, and exception handling. A conclusion was drawn about the favorability of all three languages and future expectations.

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ProjectA-HumerS.pdf” save=”1″]

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SDLC: Strategic Education Management System (SEMS)
Course: Software Engineering Project
Spring 2014
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Developed a 17-entity non-working education management prototype, as a team of two, to track and forecast institution performance, compromised of student and teacher performance, based on a set criteria. The software development lifecycle was followed to create thorough documentation.

ISR: The initial system requirement was developed to define the problem, propose a solution, define the system scope using an object flow diagram and information topology chart, define the system objectives, define the expected benefits, prepare an overview of storage requirements using an entity relationship diagram, anticipating outputs, completing a feasibility analysis report, and setting up an initial project schedule.

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ISR_HumerS_NagleB-DOC.pdf”  save=”1″][gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ISR_HumerS_NagleB-PPT.pdf” save=”1″]

RS: The requirement specification was a 15-entity depiction that detailed a redefined system overview, storage requirements, operational requirements, business rules, and images of a non-working prototype design.

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEMS-RS_HumerS_NagleB-DOC.pdf” save=”1″][gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEMS-RS_HumerS_NagleB-PPT.pdf” save=”1″]

DS: The requirement specification detailed a redefined system overview, database specification, operations specification, user interface specification, message and help specification, as well as a summary concluding with a PERT diagram of the project.

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEMS-DS_HumerS_NagleB-DOC.pdf” save=”1″][gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEMS-DS_HumerS_NagleB-PPT.pdf” save=”1″]

Prototype: The prototype is a non-working depiction of the system using the Django Web framework, an HTML/CSS front-end using the Twitter Bootstrap, and an SQLite back-end created using Django. An accompanying powerpoint was presented during a seminar to describe the project and talk through our documentation.

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEMS-Prototype-HumerS_NagleB_PPT.pdf” save=”1″]

A zip of the front-end can be downloaded here.

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Coding: Java Tower Defense Game
Course: Advanced Programming Development
Fall 2013
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Developed a multi-level executable game, as an independent project, containing a detailed main menu, custom graphics, math logic fundamentals, a running thread and AI movement; including 22 classes and over 3,400 lines of code.

The project requires focusing on three major programming tasks, including the design and implementation of the screen, the design and movement of the enemies, and the design and response of the towers. The game must blend all three, allowing towers to be placed on the screen, allowing enemies to move across the screen, and to allow the towers to attack the enemies.

The screen requires a thread to update the painted components often. When the game is launched, the thread is started, and the screen updates based on an FPS check up to 500 times in a second. The screen is broken up into two grids, one menu, and various information displays. The separation is necessary to give the user a sense that one of the menus and the information panel are not part of the game world, but separate. The information displays alert the user of important data to further interact with the screen.

The enemies utilize several classes to move across the main grid, and are stored in an array. A level file is created, using numbers one through four, to signify different areas on the map. “If” statements are then used to make each number lead to a certain action. If the number is a two, it will be used as the starting spot. If the number is a 0, it will be used as a tower spot. If the number is a 1, it will be used as an enemy pathway. And if the number is a 3, it will be used as the end of the pathway. Once each enemy in the array locates the spawn point, it uses if statements to check the surrounding locations on the grid, using iteration, to find the next spot to move to. It then continues this process until it reaches the end of the map, where it will interact with one of the information panels and reduce a “life.”

The towers are stored in an array, and also interact with a towerMap array. This array keeps track of all locations on the grid, and any stored towers within it. If a location on the grid is a 0, a tower can be placed. If it is not a 0, it cannot be placed. Further, towers are bought from a shop grid. The shop grid reads out the entire tower array to display all towers, and are clickable and draggable using the MouseHandler class. When another location on the screen is clicked, the mouse hand is checked to see if it contains a tower. If it does, it will try to place the tower if it is on the grid. If there is nothing in the hand, another if-statement looks to see if there is anything clickable in that area, such as the start/play/pause/stop buttons, the audio button, the fast forward button, or the home menu button.

A working .jar file may be downloaded here.

An 8-image gallery of the game can be seen here.

A github repo with the source code can be found here.

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Report: OS Fingerprinting Techniques & Tools
Course: Cryptography & Network Security
Fall 2013
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Researched and presented the process behind various OS fingerprinting techniques and uses. The report begins with the process of identifying a remote host’s operating system based on analyzing packets from that host. Non-automated techniques involve three different groups: direct and indirect banner grabbing, TCP & ICMP fingerprinting, and active scanners & passive sniffers. Automated techniques include a discussion of notable active scanners nmap and Xprobe2 and the passive sniffer p0f. A demonstration in Wireshark shows passive sniffing manually. Internal uses and external threats for Network Administrators, ethical hackers, and malicious hackers are discussed as a conclusion.

The report is attached:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/OS-Fingerprinting-Techniques-Tools.pdf” save=”1″]

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Management: Marketing SocialWizer: An International Mobile App
Course: Marketing & Operations Management
Spring 2013
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Conducted semester-long research on designing, developing, and implementing marketing techniques for a mobile application targeted for International students to integrate into new societies. The application was developed as a result of research-backed frustration among the International students to learn and adapt to the new environment in a short amount of time.

This was a group project involving three other Chinese students and was presented in front of a faculty board in York, England. The project was given a high mark, resulting in a “first class” marking, which translates to an A in the American education system.

Here is what was covered in the presentation:

  • Mission and vision statement, usage context, competitors, market statistics, problem definition, solution definition, features, benefits, market segment, business influence, PESTLE analysis, SWOT analysis, Porter’s Five Forces Analysis, branding strategy, icon strategy, website strategy, market content strategy, social media strategy, costs, and the future.

Here is the powerpoint that accompanied the presentation:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/SocialWizer-Presentation.pptx” save=”1″]

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Report: Android Marketing Strategy
Course: Marketing & Operations Management
Spring 2013
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Researched and developed a 16-page report on the effectiveness of Android’s marketing strategy given its marketing environment and customer base over the course of a semester while studying in York, England. The report highlights the priority of increasing Google’s ad revenue, involvement of lawsuits and privacy criticisms, influence of branding under Google, and overall success of Android in obtaining its goal of market dominance and expansion among multiple mobile channels. Recommendations given included Android to strive for innovation in the midst of competitor Apple and to hold as much market-share as possible.

The paper is broken down into the macro-environment, micro-environment, and internal-environment, with the following tools being utilized: BCG matrix, life cycle model, and SWOT Analysis.

The report is attached:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Android-Marketing-Report.pdf” save=”1″]

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Report: The Progression of Middleham Castle
Course: The Visible Past
Spring 2013
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Researched and wrote a 2,900-word report detailing the appearance of Middleham Castle between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and what led to those changes. The report starts with an appropriate definition of castles and the role they had in England throughout their existence then chronologically details castle changes, including: stone over timber, the entrance gatehouse, the two-story keep, and all the various components within. The report contains 31 personally taken images and seven figures to detail these changes.

The report is attached:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/The-Progression-of-Middleham-Castle.pdf” save=”1″]

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Report: Rievaulx Abbey and the History of its Inhabitants
Course: The Visible Past
Spring 2013
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Researched and wrote a ,3666-word report detailing an examination of Rievaulx Abbey, a prominent English monastery, and what it says about the history of its medieval inhabitants. The report details the chronology of the abbey, starting from a small, simple life to a grandeur display of size, architectural detail, and subtle features such as floor tiling. Much of the architecture describes the changing beliefs of the monks who lived there from internal prayer to external stimuli. The report contains 35 personally taken images.

The report is attached:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Rievaulx-Abbey-and-the-History-of-its-Inhabitants.pdf” save=”1″]

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Report: An Analysis of Building the Roman Empire
Course: Empires
Spring 2013
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Researched and wrote a 3,348-word report analyzing the building of the Roman Empire and whether it was due to their superior weaponry. The report starts with an overview comparing the political and military involvement of the Romans and states that superior military discipline and organization, not weaponry, should be given major credit for building the Roman Empire. The report details the political history of the Empire, followed by founding the Empire upon military considerations and an analysis of the weaponry used.

The report is attached:

[gview file=”http://stevehumer.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/An-Analysis-of-Building-the-Roman-Empire.pdf” save=”1″]

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